Every year since I was 21 (2006), I have taken a photo of myself the day before (or a couple of days before) my birthday to document the changes in myself every year. It’s been a neat project to look back on. 🙂

Every year since I was 21 (2006), I have taken a photo of myself the day before (or a couple of days before) my birthday to document the changes in myself every year. It’s been a neat project to look back on. 🙂

Birthdays & NaNoWriMo

Tomorrow is my birthday.

It’s hard to believe this will be the last year of my 20s. I suppose I should be having one of those “HOLY SHIT I’M SO OLD AND I HAVEN’T DONE ALL THE THINGS” moments, but I’m not. I’m thankful for every year I get to live, and while I would have liked to have already had several published works under my belt, things come when they’re supposed to. I’m actively working as hard as I can do achieve the things I want to, and that’s all I can do.

We don’t have any plans for my birthday. I’ve been feeling physically shitty, so I’m just hoping to feel like a functional human being. Tomorrow is also Halloween/Samhain, so I hope you all have a nice holiday, too. 🙂

NaNoWriMo starts midnight on November 1st.

I still haven’t decided if I’m going to participate this year. I really, really want to, but I’m still working on my character profiles and scene mapping for everything in my rewrite, so I don’t know if I’m going to be able to devote 30 solid days to actual writing. I know I’ll be doing well over 50K worth of rewrites for the book, but I have so much left that I want to do in preparation before I start that.

I’ve thought about maybe working on some short stories as my NaNo entry this year, because I have several sitting in my memory bank waiting to be written, but I don’t know if I have the energy to devote to both the rewrite and to writing 50K worth of short stories.

I love NaNoWriMo because it gets me so pumped about writing and about creating, but at the same time, I wish I had put more thought into what I was doing from the start. I’ve been working on the same novel for what will be three years now because it started out as a NaNo novel.

When I did (and failed) my first NaNo three years ago, I started with a vague idea that has since grown into the book I’m still working on. It started out as something completely and totally unrecognizable from what it has grown to be.

It’s my own fault. I didn’t expect to turn my NaNo novel into something I wanted to seriously pursue, so I wrote it pretty willy nilly without much forethought. And since the goal of NaNo is to write as much as possible as fast as possible, I took shortcuts that I regret now, because to tell the story I *need* to tell, it’s going to take massive rewrites. And over three years of work. I thought I was just participating in a silly challenge. I didn’t realize I was starting a project that would turn into something that would massively change my life.

Sometimes I feel silly that it’s taken me so long to finish a 200+K novel. I’ve *finished* it twice already, let it sit for several months only to realize that it isn’t what I want it to be. Some people might think it’s silly for me to put so much work into a first novel, but I want it to be something I’m proud of. I want it to truly be the story I want to tell, and if that takes me another three years then so be it.

I think I’ve finally gotten the story right with this rewrite, so that’s why I’m doing everything I can to plan, plan, plan this time. I want to finish this book. I want people to read this book! But I want it done right.

I got a little off track there, but the point is that I’m not sure if I’ll be doing NaNoWriMo this year even though I really, really want to. I’ve signed up of course, so if you’d like to be writing buddies you should add me here:

http://nanowrimo.org/participants/sayhedgehog

If I do decide to participate, I will be doing daily or semi-daily updates here like I did last year. I can’t wait to see all of your progress, so good luck and happy writing! 🙂

Birthdays & NaNoWriMo

Tomorrow is my birthday.

It’s hard to believe this will be the last year of my 20s. I suppose I should be having one of those “HOLY SHIT I’M SO OLD AND I HAVEN’T DONE ALL THE THINGS” moments, but I’m not. I’m thankful for every year I get to live, and while I would have liked to have already had several published works under my belt, things come when they’re supposed to. I’m actively working as hard as I can do achieve the things I want to, and that’s all I can do.

We don’t have any plans for my birthday. I’ve been feeling physically shitty, so I’m just hoping to feel like a functional human being. Tomorrow is also Halloween/Samhain, so I hope you all have a nice holiday, too. 🙂

NaNoWriMo starts midnight on November 1st.

I still haven’t decided if I’m going to participate this year. I really, really want to, but I’m still working on my character profiles and scene mapping for everything in my rewrite, so I don’t know if I’m going to be able to devote 30 solid days to actual writing. I know I’ll be doing well over 50K worth of rewrites for the book, but I have so much left that I want to do in preparation before I start that.

I’ve thought about maybe working on some short stories as my NaNo entry this year, because I have several sitting in my memory bank waiting to be written, but I don’t know if I have the energy to devote to both the rewrite and to writing 50K worth of short stories.

I love NaNoWriMo because it gets me so pumped about writing and about creating, but at the same time, I wish I had put more thought into what I was doing from the start. I’ve been working on the same novel for what will be three years now because it started out as a NaNo novel.

When I did (and failed) my first NaNo three years ago, I started with a vague idea that has since grown into the book I’m still working on. It started out as something completely and totally unrecognizable from what it has grown to be.

It’s my own fault. I didn’t expect to turn my NaNo novel into something I wanted to seriously pursue, so I wrote it pretty willy nilly without much forethought. And since the goal of NaNo is to write as much as possible as fast as possible, I took shortcuts that I regret now, because to tell the story I *need* to tell, it’s going to take massive rewrites. And over three years of work. I thought I was just participating in a silly challenge. I didn’t realize I was starting a project that would turn into something that would massively change my life.

Sometimes I feel silly that it’s taken me so long to finish a 200+K novel. I’ve *finished* it twice already, let it sit for several months only to realize that it isn’t what I want it to be. Some people might think it’s silly for me to put so much work into a first novel, but I want it to be something I’m proud of. I want it to truly be the story I want to tell, and if that takes me another three years then so be it.

I think I’ve finally gotten the story right with this rewrite, so that’s why I’m doing everything I can to plan, plan, plan this time. I want to finish this book. I want people to read this book! But I want it done right.

I got a little off track there, but the point is that I’m not sure if I’ll be doing NaNoWriMo this year even though I really, really want to. I’ve signed up of course, so if you’d like to be writing buddies you should add me here:

http://nanowrimo.org/participants/sayhedgehog

If I do decide to participate, I will be doing daily or semi-daily updates here like I did last year. I can’t wait to see all of your progress, so good luck and happy writing! 🙂

10 NaNoWriMo Tips

writingbox:

  1. Get as far ahead of the daily target as you can in week 1 while you’re running on adrenaline. Week 2 is tough, and having a good margin will help you enormously.
  2. Turn off the television. If you think you can write in front of the tv you are just kidding yourself.
  3. Treat yourself for reaching goals. Put your favourite chocolate bar, cake, beer, or whatever your vice is, on the table in front of you while you write. Don’t allow yourself to have it until you’ve written your daily word target. It’ll also make your treat taste that much better…
  4. Be strict on yourself. Sit down and tell yourself you will write for 20mins, or 30mins, or an hour. Actually do it. Turn off the tv, hide from other people and stay off the internet. Write.
  5. Don’t do it alone. Whether you meet up with people in real life, or meet up with people online, just meet up with someone. Make friends, encourage each other, motivate each other, compete against each other. (And most importantly, drink coffee with each other)
  6. Compete against your writing buddies. Each day, check the word counts of your writing buddies. Decide whose wordcount you’re going to try and beat, then do it.
  7. Take part in word wars (also known as word sprints.) Either meet up with friends or play with people online. Agree on an amount of time (20 mins, 1 hour, 24 hours) and at the end of that time, see who’s written the most words. Good fun, a great way to make friends and super productive too.
  8. Don’t take more than one day off in a row. NaNoWriMo is full-on, and we all need a break now and again. We also all have a life to live outside of NaNo. Don’t feel guilty about taking the odd day off. But if you make it two days off, it’ll be that much harder to get back into it. Three days, and you’ll really struggle. More days and you’re unlikely to get back to it at all.
  9. Trust your characters. Whether you’re a strict outliner or more of a discovery writer, you can often find your characters rebel; leading your story off in a direction you didn’t expect. Let them explore, you may find out that they have had a better idea than you did! And if your characters do start telling their own story, be glad. It only means that you have written them well, and written them fully, managing to bring them completely to life.
  10. Just keep going. So what if you’re 5,000 words behind? So what if you’re only managing 800 words a day? So what if it’s 11.30pm on November 30th and you’ve only written 30,000 words. Not everyone will hit their 50k target, but that doesn’t mean they’ve failed at all. By carrying on until the end of the month you have achieved an incredible feat no matter what your word count. The only true failure is giving up.

10 NaNoWriMo Tips

writingbox:

  1. Get as far ahead of the daily target as you can in week 1 while you’re running on adrenaline. Week 2 is tough, and having a good margin will help you enormously.
  2. Turn off the television. If you think you can write in front of the tv you are just kidding yourself.
  3. Treat yourself for reaching goals. Put your favourite chocolate bar, cake, beer, or whatever your vice is, on the table in front of you while you write. Don’t allow yourself to have it until you’ve written your daily word target. It’ll also make your treat taste that much better…
  4. Be strict on yourself. Sit down and tell yourself you will write for 20mins, or 30mins, or an hour. Actually do it. Turn off the tv, hide from other people and stay off the internet. Write.
  5. Don’t do it alone. Whether you meet up with people in real life, or meet up with people online, just meet up with someone. Make friends, encourage each other, motivate each other, compete against each other. (And most importantly, drink coffee with each other)
  6. Compete against your writing buddies. Each day, check the word counts of your writing buddies. Decide whose wordcount you’re going to try and beat, then do it.
  7. Take part in word wars (also known as word sprints.) Either meet up with friends or play with people online. Agree on an amount of time (20 mins, 1 hour, 24 hours) and at the end of that time, see who’s written the most words. Good fun, a great way to make friends and super productive too.
  8. Don’t take more than one day off in a row. NaNoWriMo is full-on, and we all need a break now and again. We also all have a life to live outside of NaNo. Don’t feel guilty about taking the odd day off. But if you make it two days off, it’ll be that much harder to get back into it. Three days, and you’ll really struggle. More days and you’re unlikely to get back to it at all.
  9. Trust your characters. Whether you’re a strict outliner or more of a discovery writer, you can often find your characters rebel; leading your story off in a direction you didn’t expect. Let them explore, you may find out that they have had a better idea than you did! And if your characters do start telling their own story, be glad. It only means that you have written them well, and written them fully, managing to bring them completely to life.
  10. Just keep going. So what if you’re 5,000 words behind? So what if you’re only managing 800 words a day? So what if it’s 11.30pm on November 30th and you’ve only written 30,000 words. Not everyone will hit their 50k target, but that doesn’t mean they’ve failed at all. By carrying on until the end of the month you have achieved an incredible feat no matter what your word count. The only true failure is giving up.

Save Pseudopod!

If anyone wants to give me a really badass birthday present (Halloween) this year, you can donate to one of my favorite podcasts, Pseudopod. Without drastic help, they are going to have to cease production at the end of 2013, and this would make me very, very sad. I have gotten hours and hours of enjoyment from this podcast, and I would be deeply saddened if it were to disappear. The authors, voice actors, and production folks are all excellent and deserve to do what they love.

Unfortunately, due to some crappy circumstances, things are exceptionally tight for me right now, so I cannot afford to donate myself. Thus, I am alerting you all to their need in hopes that at least one person will be able to take up my slack.

If you feel so inclined, you can donate here: http://pseudopod.org/support/#donate

Thank you!

Save Pseudopod!

If anyone wants to give me a really badass birthday present (Halloween) this year, you can donate to one of my favorite podcasts, Pseudopod. Without drastic help, they are going to have to cease production at the end of 2013, and this would make me very, very sad. I have gotten hours and hours of enjoyment from this podcast, and I would be deeply saddened if it were to disappear. The authors, voice actors, and production folks are all excellent and deserve to do what they love.

Unfortunately, due to some crappy circumstances, things are exceptionally tight for me right now, so I cannot afford to donate myself. Thus, I am alerting you all to their need in hopes that at least one person will be able to take up my slack.

If you feel so inclined, you can donate here: http://pseudopod.org/support/#donate

Thank you!